Veranstaltungstexte HS 21

Binder, Stefan
The Anthropology of Ethics: A Master Class with James Laidlaw
Seminar
Do 12.15-13.45

In this Master Class, we will discuss selected texts by James Laidlaw, a major figure in the so-called ethical turn in anthropology. James Laidlaw is the William Wyse Professor of Social Anthropology at Cambridge University and Director of the Max Planck-Cambridge Centre for Ethics, Economy and Social Change. He has conducted intense fieldwork on Jainism in India and more recently on Buddhism in China, Bhutan, and Taiwan and contributed to larger theoretical debates on ritual theory, ethics, and gift exchange. We will engage in detail with his monograph "The subject of virtue: an anthropology of ethics and freedom" (2014), which draws on the work of philosopher Michel Foucault and focuses in particular on rethinking the concepts of freedom, responsibility, and morality from an anthropological perspective. In addition to this, we will consider different interpretations, applications, and criticisms of this book within academia. This seminar includes a visit by James Laidlaw and an interactive session (Master Class) for participants of the seminar. Students will furthermore have the opportunity to participate in a workshop at UZH, in which James Laidlaw discusses the different ways his work on the anthropology of ethics has been taken up in anthropology and beyond.

Literature:

Laidlaw, James. 2014. The Subject of Virtue: An Anthropology of Ethics and Freedom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Weblink:

https://www.socanth.cam.ac.uk/directory/professor-james-laidlaw

Anrechenbarkeit:

MA: Fokus Ethics, Religion, Knowledge (Hauptfach 90 und Nebenfach 30)

Binder, Stefan und Dalmia, Katyayani
Lecture Series in Social Anthropology Fall Semester 2021 (Jubilee Edition)
Kolloquium
Di 16.15-18.00

In the context of our department’s 50-year jubilee, this semester’s lecture series in Social and Cultural Anthropology will take place as a thematic and interdisciplinary series that explores different approaches to and aspects of the question "What is the human?" The lecture series consists of 9 sessions with at least two speakers from different disciplinary backgrounds. Presentations in these sessions will be followed by a general discussion with the invited scholars.
Additionally, every third week (weeks without public lectures) the students will meet with the colloquium instructors for a reading-based discussion on issues raised in the lectures.

Learning goals

Students will be exposed to current research and debates in both Social and Cultural Anthropology as well as neighboring disciplines from Social Sciences, Humanities, and Law. They will gain insight into how similar topics are addressed by different disciplines, and become familiar with scholarship related to the theme of the human both at UZH and internationally. The Colloquium provides a forum for dialogue and scholarly exchange, while students explore the potential of the academic presentation as a form of knowledge production.

Requirements

Students will attend the 9 public lectures, as well as the 4 discussion sessions with colloquium instructors. The latter will involve some reading. Module assignments are designed to help students engage more closely with the lectures and topics they address. These include biographic and thematic background research on guest speakers, as well as protocols detailing the lectures and ensuing discussions.

Program (PDF, 153 KB)

Anrechenbarkeit:
BA: Thematische Erweiterungen (Hautpfach 120 und Nebenfach 60)
MA: Anthropological Theories (Hauptfach 90 und Nebenfach 30)

Binder, Stefan / Derks, Annuska / Finke, Peter / Flitsch, Mareile
Einführung in die Ethnologie
Vorlesung
Di 10.15-12.00 und Do 10.15-12.00

Die Vorlesung Einführung Ethnologie vermittelt ein Grundverständnis und einen Überblick über die Gegenstandsbereiche der Ethnologie. Sie dient Studierenden dazu, einen ersten Einblick in die thematische Breite des Faches sowie in seine Veränderungen im Laufe der letzten Jahrzehnte zu gewinnen. Im Mittelpunkt steht dabei die kritische Auseinandersetzung mit zentralen Konzepten und wissenschaftlichen Traditionen im Fach, sowie die Frage, wie sich ihre Bedeutungen mit der Zeit verändert haben. Neben den zentralen Fragestellungen und Debatten findet auch eine kurze Einführung in die epistemologischen, theoretischen und methodischen Traditionen des Faches statt.

Lernziel:

Die Vorlesung hat das Ziel Studierende in das Fach der Ethnologie einzuführen. Hierzu werden die zentralen Konzepte und Gegenstandsbereiche vorgestellt und diskutiert. Dies soll eine kritische Auseinandersetzung auch mit deren historischen Entwicklung ermöglichen. Die Vorlesung stellt die Grundlage für alle kommenden Module des Studiums dar.

Hinweis:

Prüfungstermin: 23. Dezember 2021, 10.15 Uhr. Zu dieser Vorlesung wird eine Wiederholungsprüfung angeboten (Termin: 1. Februar 2022, 10.15 Uhr). Bitte beachten Sie dazu die Informationen des Studiendekanats.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Einführung in die Ethnologie (Hauptfach 120, Nebenfach 60 und Nebenfach 30)

Bristley, Joseph
Scale and Anthropology: Space, Time, and Knowledge-production in Anthropological Perspective
Seminar
Do 14.00-15.45

For a generation or so, ‘scale’ has occupied an important place in the anthropological imagination. Capable of describing particular ethnographic situations as well as functioning as an important analytic category, attention to ‘scale’ and ‘scale-making’ has underpinned numerous recent anthropological insights. These range from deepened understandings of globalisation and the Anthropocene, to renewed attention to the comparative method.

Drawing on classic ethnographies and recent theoretical texts, this M.A. seminar course is devoted to understanding different anthropological uses and understandings of scale. From early studies of ‘small-scale societies’ to current attempts to understand global financial processes and climate change, ‘scale’ is revealed as central to the anthropological endeavour. Individual seminars will focus on themes including the importance of scale in understanding economic practices, processes of time-reckoning, and social framings of space and place. They will also consider the theoretical and methodological implications of the early twenty-first century ‘turn’ to scale.

Anrechenbarkeit:
MA: Thematic, Regional and Methodological Extensions (Hauptfach 90 und Nebenfach 30)

Bristley, Joseph und Finke, Peter
Regionalmodul Zentralasien: Anthropology of Central Asia
Seminar
Mi 12.15-13.45

This course will offer an introduction to the anthropological engagement with the larger region of Central Asia. Geographically, it will cover the five former Soviet republics of Kazakstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Turkmenistan as well as the autonomous regions of Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia and Tibet in the People’s Republic of China and the independent state of Mongolia. Occupying a large part of the Eurasian continent, the region shares many characteristics like the co-existence of nomadic and sedentary societies, specific forms of social and political organizations or the influence of global religious systems such as Islam, Buddhism and Christianity. In the course of the 20th century, people in Central Asia experienced fundamental changes to their livelihoods as they participated in the construction of socialist regimes and their later dismantling.

During the course we will discuss a broad range of economic, social, cultural and political aspects that are specific to the region. Taking into account the historical trajectories the focus will be on the impacts of the post-socialist transformation and contemporary livelihoods of local people. While this has created new economic opportunities and cultural pluralism, in many parts it has also resulted in widespread impoverishment and the resurrection of highly exploitative structures. The aim of the course is to look at these developments from a comparative perspective.

Anrechenbarkeit:
BA: Regionale Ethnologie (Hauptfach 120, Nebenfach 60 und Nebenfach 30)
MA: Thematic, Regional and Methodological Extensions (Hauptfach 90 und Nebenfach 30)

Dalmia, Katyayani
The Body as Surface: Knowing the Self and Other Through Appearance
Seminar
Fr 12.15-13.45

How are aspects of bodily appearance such as skin tone, hair and dress used in racial and other systems of classification in different parts of the world? In this course we explore how the surface of the body is significant in how we assess others, and thus also in how we experience ourselves. How is the exterior body both a site of self-expression and systemic exclusion? What is the bodily surface thought to reveal about the interior? How does comportment, or the grooming of particular features such as hair, tie in with religious belief, or systems of gender? Over the semester, we look at examples of how racism varies globally, and think through the relationship between racism and colorism in different cultural and political locations.  We also consider social scientific literature on the presentation of self, and embodied experience as related to appearance. Through the seminar, we reflect on the relationship between identity and the body, gain insight into how physical features are variously used to differentiate, hierarchize, and exclude, and unpack what goes into how we “see” others.

Anrechenbarkeit:
BA: Thematische Erweiterungen (Hauptfach 120 und Nebenfach 60)

Dietz, Daniela und Eisner, Rivka
Ethical Questions in Engaged Anthropology
Seminar
Fr 10.15-12.00

The seminar «Ethical Questions in Engaged Anthropology» aims to make ethical issues empirically tangible through a combination of theoretical discussion and hands-on learning. It is designed to practice the ethical imperatives about which we explore.

To bring together historical analysis and theory, experiential engagement and reflection, and higher-order learning processes, this course consists of three parts. The first part will explore and discuss relevant contributions to the history and politics of ethics in the field of anthropology, with special emphasis on so-called “engaged anthropology.” Topics of interest may include the relationship between ethics and politics, ethical institutionalization and change, social engagement and subjectivity, humanism/post-humanism, social equality and diversity, responsibility and temporality, the extents and limits of fieldwork ethics, and research and reciprocity. In the second part, students will participate in a community project of their own choosing for a short period of time (e.g. 10-15 hours of service). An essential part of this activity will be students’ continuous reflection on how central values within engaged anthropology such as humility, respect and reciprocity are (or are not) realised within their projects. In the final part, we will critically reflect on these experiences, and create a shared form (e.g. a publication and/or event, etc.) as a means of exchanging and carrying forward what the students have learned throughout the semester.

Anrechenbarkeit:
BA: Thematische Erweiterungen (Hauptfach 120 und Nebenfach 60)

Derks, Annuska
Kernbereich Verwandtschaft und Gender
Vorlesung
Di 14.00-15.45

Diese Vorlesung bietet Studierenden eine Einführung in die diversen Vorstellungen und Erscheinungsformen von Gender und Verwandtschaft weltweit. Anhand ethnographischer Beispiele aus verschiedenen Teilen der Welt werden die soziale und historische Vielfalt von, sowie die Verschränkungen zwischen Gender, Sexualität und Verwandtschaft beleuchtet. Einerseits geht es darum, einen Überblick über die theoretischen Entwicklungen in der Verwandtschafts- und Gender- Ethnologie zu verschaffen von den Anfängen der genealogischen Methoden bis zu den heutigen Debatten in den New Kinship, Gender und Queer Studies. Andererseits geht es auch darum, dass Studierende sich kritisch mit den eigenen, als selbstverständlich wahrgenommenen Vorstellungen von Gender und Verwandtschaft auseinandersetzen.

Lernziel:

Studierende, die diese Vorlesung besuchen gewinnen einen Einblick in die Diversität und Variabilität von Gender- und Verwandtschaftsbeziehungen und lernen sich kritisch mit den Verschränkungen von Verwandtschaft, Geschlecht und Sexualität auseinanderzusetzen. Sie erwerben grundlegendes Wissen bezüglich Konzepten und Methoden der Verwandtschaftsforschung in der Ethnologie und gewinnen einen fundierten Überblick über die Geschichte der Verwandtschafts- und Gender-Ethnologie von den Anfängen bis heute. Sie lernen aktuelle Fragestellungen und Forschungsgebiete der Gender- und Verwandtschaftsethnologie kennen und verstehen die Relevanz von Gender und Verwandtschaft für die Analyse von Themenbereichen wie Wirtschaft, Macht, Religion, Globalisierung und Migration.

Hinweis:

Prüfungstermin: 21. Dezember 2021 14.00 Uhr. Zu dieser Vorlesung wird eine Wiederholungsprüfung angeboten (Termin: 1. Februar 2022, 14.00 Uhr). Bitte beachten Sie dazu die Informationen des Studiendekanats.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Hauptfach 120, Nebenfach 60 und Nebenfach 30)

Derks, Annuska
Doing Ethnography
Übung
Fr 10.15-12.00

In this course, you will apply ethnographic methods within the framework of a small individual research project. The aim is to learn how to set up an ethnographic research project independently, which means finding a research question, developing a research design and getting familiar with different methodological approaches. You will carry out your individual project, analyse your findings and put them into writing while we will be discussing important issues concerning this process via short readings in our sessions.

Parts of the course are small presentations about your individual project, written assignments as well as active participation in the discussions.

This module can serve as a preparation or for your own research in the future.

The class can be held either in English or German depending on the students taking part.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Ethnologische Praxis (Hauptfach 120 und Nebenfach 60)
MA: Thematic, Regional and Methodological Extensions (Hautpfach 90 und Nebenfach 30)

Dietz, Daniela und Hertzog, Werner
Theories in Anthropology
Seminar
Di 14.00-15.45

This course is designed for Ma-students to make themselves familiar with a variety of theoretical strands used in anthropology. The detailed discussion of classic as well as contemporary concepts shall help students framing and preparing their research and data analysis. Theoretical approaches used by anthropologists vary substantially, both in context as well as in their epistemological foundation. In this course, we will focus on approaches that take an explanatory start and address key issues of the social and cultural sciences in general. Why do people behave the way they do? What unites and what distinguishes us as humans? How is social order established and maintained, and what is the source of inequality within societies? Why do we have culture and religion?

Learning Outcome:

This seminar is an advanced course on anthropological theories. It familiarises students with classic theories as well as current debates to develop their own taking and support them when analysing their own empirical data. Theories discussed in this course are of a general nature, applicable to a range of issues in cultural and social anthropology. By way of intensive reading and in-class discussion students will develop their skills in engaging with theoretical texts and debates. The course will enable students to apply theory to their respective research themes.

Anrechenbarkeit:

MA: Anthropological Theories (Hauptfach 90 und Nebenfach 30)

Dietz, Daniela und Sancak, Meltem
Anthropologie der Migration
Seminar
Di 10.15-12.00

Migration ist ein allgegenwärtiges Thema. Im globalen politischen Kontext wird es dabei wie selbstverständlich als eine andauernde und anwachsende Krise dargestellt. Hintergrund dessen ist unter anderem die Idee, dass es sich hier um Verschiebungen in einer scheinbar natürlichen Ordnung handelt, die abnormal sind und primär Konflikte für das Zusammenleben mit sich bringen; eine Integration der zugewanderten Menschen gilt häufig in diesem Ausmass als unmöglich oder ist aus anderen Gründen unerwünscht. Studien zu Migration bleiben dabei meist der Makroperspektive von (National-)Staat, Gesellschaft und globalen Zusammenhängen verhaftet.

Im Gegensatz dazu betrachtet die Ethnologie Migration aus einer Alltagssicht, bei der die Perspektiven, Erfahrungen und Handlungen der betroffenen Akteure in den Vordergrund gestellt und auf ihre Zusammenhänge mit übergreifenden Phänomenen (wie z. B. der Entstehung neuer transnationaler Beziehungen oder Migrationsregime) untersucht werden. Zugleich betont sie den universalen Charakter von Migration. Menschen haben schon immer ihren Herkunftsort verlassen aus den unterschiedlichsten Gründen – freiwillig oder erzwungen, aus Abenteuerlust und zur Horizonterweiterung, aus ökonomischen, politischen oder sozialen Motiven, um Krieg, Klimawandel oder Schwiegermutter zu entfliehen. Ethnologische Forschungen verdeutlichen auch, dass Migrationsprozesse nicht isoliert zu betrachten, sondern immer auch Teil eines grösseren gesellschaftlichen Ganzen sind, ein Aspekt von allgemeineren Prozessen ökonomischen und sozialen Wandels.

In diesem Seminar werden wir sowohl verschiedene Theorien und Konzepte zu Migration diskutieren als auch eine Reihe ethnographischer Fallstudien lesen und uns zum Beispiel fragen, inwiefern Hoffnung und Unsicherheit Migrationsprozesse begleiten und prägen, warum manche Menschen migrieren und andere nicht oder welche Rückwirkungen sich auf die Heimatländer ergeben.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Hauptfach 120, Nebenfach 60 und Nebenfach 30)

Dommann, Monika und Kaufmann, Lena
Observing the Past & Present: Cultural Anthropology and Contemporary History in Dialogue
Kolloquium
Mi 10.15-12.00

Being open to students from both fields, this course brings cultural anthropology and contemporary history into a methodological dialogue. Both fields have much to gain from each other. Among others, anthropology benefits strongly from a historical perspective in order to understand the present. Moreover, with its conventional focus on studying oral societies and the resulting partial neglect of written sources, history provides valuable input with regard to the analysis of written documents collected alongside ethnographic fieldwork. Likewise, contemporary history benefits from the analysis of non-textual sources. It needs anthropological methods such as qualitative and oral history interviews, the analysis of material culture and, where possible, participant observation to gain in-depth insights into the complexity of people’s life-worlds and thinking. In addition, in times of the Covid-19 pandemic and restricted access to sources, methods from the field of digital anthropology may prove useful, while also raising new questions of research ethics. Based on the discussion of literature from both fields as well as practical method exercises, this course focuses on how insights and methods between the two subjects may fruitfully enrich each other.

Course Materials

Emerson, Robert M., Rachel I. Fretz, and Linda L. Shaw. 2011. ‘Chapter 2: Fieldnotes in Ethnographic Research’. In Writing Ethnographic Fieldnotes, 1–20. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Spradley, James P. 2016 [1980]. ‘Step 2: Doing Participant Observation’. In Participant Observation. Fort Worth et al.: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich College Publishers. Terkel, Studs, with Tony Parker. 2006. ‘Interviewing an Interviewer’. In The Oral History Reader, edited by Robert Perks and Alistair Thomson, 123–28. London; New York.

Notes

The class will be held in English. The course is open to both students of contemporary history and social and cultural anthropology. Some of the exercises will take place in pairs or groups combining students from each field. Students are expected to read all the texts assigned during the class and to write forum posts (each about 1500 characters) for five of these texts. The posts will be shared within the class. The deadline for submitting the forum posts is Mondays at midnight before the respective text is discussed in class. In addition, students will carry out several practical method exercises. They will present their material and findings in groups at the end of the term, during the final two course sessions.

Anrechenbarkeit:
BA: Thematische Erweiterungen (Hauptfach 120 und Nebenfach 60)

Eisner, Rivka
Master-Colloquium I+II
Di 10.15-12.00

Master-Colloquium I is designed as a workshop for students before they start their fieldwork, museum research or extended literature study. Students get the chance to present their research project and debate their preliminary research concept. The formulation of research questions and state of the art, the writing of the research proposal, theoretical conceptualization, methodological approach, and ethical concerns are discussed with peers, senior researchers and supervisors. To pass the Colloquium, the research projects must be presented and discussed and a written research concept must be handed in before the end of the semester.

Students learn how to present individual research projects and discuss it with colleagues and supervisors. Based on these discussions, they develop or revise their research concept. Students also learn to give constructive feedback on their peers' projects and learn the tricks of the trade of scientific exchange.

Master-Colloquium II is designed as a workshop for students who have returned from fieldwork, done their museum research, or completed their extended literature and archival research. Students present their research results and experiences and discuss each other's research reports. Different issues relating to theory and empirical material, data analysis, and writing are discussed. To pass this course, the research must be presented and the written research report handed in before the end of the semester.

Students learn to convey their research results and research experience and reflect these. They are supported in presenting research findings and learn how to prepare and what to include in a research report. Students learn how to give constructive feedback on others' reports and learn the tricks of the trade of scientific exchange and collaborative knowledge production.

Anrechenbarkeit:

MA: Anthropological Research (Hauptfach 90)

Fitzpatrick, Molly / Kuncoro, Wahyu / Rutz, Kiah / Scherer, Mareike
Bloch, Selina / Buchmann, Fabio / Keller, Sarah / Majetic, Zarina
Einführung in die Arbeit mit ethnologischen Texten
Übungen und Tutorate
Übungen: Mo 10.15-12.00 (Gruppe A) / Mi 08.30-10.00 (Gruppe B) / Do 14.00-15.45 (Gruppen C und D) / Fr 10.15-12.00 (Gruppe E)
Tutorate: Mo 12.15-13.45 (Tutorat A) / Mi 10.15-12.00 (Tutorat B) / Do 16.15-18.00 (Tutorat C und D) / Fr 12.15-13.45 (Tutorat E)

Neben wissenschaftlichen Artikeln sind Monographien zentraler Bestandteil der Ethnologie. In diesem Modul werden die wissenschaftlichen Techniken des Lesens, Schreibens und Präsentierens miteinander verbunden. Dies geschieht in erster Linie durch eine vertiefte Auseinandersetzung mit einer klassischen Monographie, einer exemplarischen ethnologischen Forschung, sowie der Diskussion ihrer späteren Rezeption und ihrer aktuellen Relevanz. Die Studierenden erledigen während des Semesters verschiedene mündliche und schriftliche Aufgaben. Im begleitenden Tutorat werden anhand der Auseinandersetzung mit den unterschiedlichen Textgenres die Grundlagen des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens eingeführt (Bibliographieren, Zitieren, Erarbeitung einer Forschungsfrage, Verfassen von verschiedenen Textsorten, Halten von Referaten, u.a.).

Lernziel:

In diesem Modul werden zentrale Aspekte des Umgangs mit ethnologischen Texten und des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens vermittelt. Dies geschieht anhand unterschiedlicher Medien und Textgenres, wie etwa Monographie, wissenschaftliche Artikel, Präsentationen und Filmen.

Unterrichtsmaterialien:

- Gruppe A: Taussig, Michael. 2004. My Cocaine Museum. Chicago University Press. Paperback.

- Gruppe B und Gruppe C: Sharika Thirnagama. 2013. In my mother’s house. Civil War in Sri Lanka. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. Paperback.

- Gruppe D und Gruppe E: Tania Li. 2014. Land’s End. Duke University Press. Paperback.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Einführung in die Ethnologie (Hauptfach 120, Nebenfach 60 und Nebenfach 30)

Flitsch, Mareile
Kernbereich Materielle Kultur, praktisches Wissen und Kunst
Vorlesung
Mi 10.15-12.00

Im Verlauf des Semesters wird Einblick in aktuelle und relevante Forschungsfelder und methodisch-theoretische Ansätze zur ethnologischen wissenschaftlichen Beschäftigung mit materieller Kultur und praktischem Wissen geboten. Über die gemeinsame kritische Lektüre zentraler theoretischer Texte, die im Verlauf der Vorlesung in ihrem jeweiligen Hintergrund erschlossen, in ihren Kernaussagen erläutert, anhand von Fallbeispielen erweitert werden, sowie über praktische Anteile, wird ein Überblick über das Forschungsgebiet geboten und wird angestrebt, Studierende für die Bedeutung dieses Kernbereichs für ethnologische Forschung und Vermittlung zu sensibilisieren.

Lernziel:

Die Studierenden erhalten Einblick in aktuelle und relevante Forschungsfelder und methodisch-theoretische Ansätze zur ethnologischen wissenschaftlichen Beschäftigung mit materieller Kultur und praktischem Wissen. Über die gemeinsame kritische Lektüre zentraler theoretischer Texte, Fallbeispiele und praktische Anteile erhalten sie einen Überblick über das Forschungsgebiet und werden für die Bedeutung des Kernbereichs für ethnologische Forschung und Vermittlung sensibilisiert.

Hinweis:

Prüfungstermin: 22. Dezember 2021 10.15 Uhr. Zu dieser Vorlesung wird eine Wiederholungsprüfung angeboten (Termin: 2. Februar 2022 10.15 Uhr). Bitte beachten Sie dazu die Informationen des Studiendekanats.

Anrechenbarkeit:
BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Hauptfach 120, Nebenfach 60 und Nebenfach 30)

 

Hertzog, Werner
Culture, Cooperation, and Conflict
Seminar
Do 16.15-18.00

Humans cooperate and compete on a scale and intensity far greater than any other species. Such complex and large-scale patterns of cooperation are possible due to our capacity for culture – that is, our ability to learn and transfer social norms and values from and to one another. This course provides an anthropological approach to cooperation and conflict across human societies. It focuses on the role of cultural norms and values in promoting or inhibiting relations of cooperation or competition in diverse contexts. We will examine culture from a holistic perspective that includes social and cognitive processes shaping the transmission of norms, values, and meanings. We will learn about how small-scale and non-industrial societies solve problems of cooperation and conflict. We will study how the transition to modernity and large-scale/industrial economies affects social norms and institutions regulating conflict cooperation. The goal of the course is to provide insights that help students to 1) conduct research on cooperation and conflict, and 2) apply social knowledge in practical ways, either informing social policies or addressing conflict and cooperation problems across cultures.

The course addresses interdisciplinary questions pertinent to cultural anthropology, the cognitive sciences, and economics. Among those questions, the course asks: what are fairness norms, and to what extent do such norms vary across societies? Are children natural cooperators, or do they must learn to share and behave altruistically? How do trust and reputation systems regulate relations of cooperation in different societies? When and why do people break social norms, and how do social institutions emerge to regulate social behavior? How does cooperation change with modernization and at increasingly large-scale societies? Are capitalism and market-exchange changing making us more or less cooperative? What can anthropological studies on peacemaking teach us about conflict resolution and de-escalation? And can we use game theory to improve our understanding of culture and human behavior?

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Hauptfach 120, Nebenfach 60 und Nebenfach 30)

Horat, Esther
Von Big Men zu Big Money: Unternehmertum aus ethnologischer Perspektive
Seminar
Do 10.15-12.00

Die Figur des Unternehmers ist in der heutigen Zeit allgegenwärtig, nicht nur in Form von Schienenfahrzeug- oder Textilherstellern, sondern auch als Gründer*innen von Medienimperien, Techunternehmen und Vertriebsplattformen. Angesichts der dringenden Problemen unserer Zeit, zum Beispiel der drohenden Klimakatastrophe, sind es Unternehmer*innen, die mit technologiebasierten Entwicklungen Hoffnung wecken und somit eine zentrale Rolle in Politik und Gesellschaft einnehmen. Gleichzeitig sind Unternehmer*innen ambivalente Zeitgenoss*innen, die wegen ihres Erfolgs als Vorbild gelten und beneidet, oft aber auch mit Kritik und Argwohn konfrontiert werden. Nicht nur in der westlichen Hemisphäre, sondern auch in Ländern des Globalen Südens ist Unternehmertum zunehmend populär und wird von Regierungen genauso wie von internationalen Organisationen und lokalen NGO’s als Einkommensstrategie oder als Lösungsansatz im sogenannten „Disaster Kapitalismus" propagiert.

In diesem Kurs nähern wir uns der Ethnologie des Unternehmertums (Anthropology of Entrepreneurship) aus verschiedenen theoretischen und empirischen Blickwinkeln. Angefangen in der Mitte des 20. Jahrhunderts, wo einerseits der Zusammenhang von Unternehmertum und sozialem Wandel (bzw. der Unternehmer als "change agent"), und andrerseits die Rolle von Unternehmertum in der wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung im Fokus standen, verfolgen wir, wie sich die Wahrnehmung damit auch der Blick von Ethnolog*innen im Laufe der Zeit veränderte. Ethnographische Beispiele reichen von melanesischen Big Men, die zu Unternehmern wurden, über ethnisches, religiöses, ökologisches und soziales Unternehmertum bis hin zu Forschungen, die sich mit individueller Selbstverwirklichung durch Unternehmertum beschäftigen.

Lernziel

Kennenlernen von theoretischen Debatten und empirischen Fallbeispielen zu Unternehmertum. Eigenständige Literaturrecherche. Die Studierenden lernen, für die Veranstaltung relevante Konzepte kritisch zu hinterfragen.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Hauptfach 120, Nebenfach 60 und Nebenfach 30)

Jaeger, Ursina und Mörgen, Rebecca
Wissen in Bewegung. Sozialwissenschaft - Migration - Öffentlichkeit
Seminar (3 ECTS Credits)
Mo 10.00-14.00

Wie gelangt Wissen in die Öffentlichkeit? Wissenschaftler*innen haben die Aufgabe, Forschungsbefunde nicht nur dem jeweiligen Fachpublikum, sondern auch öffentlichen Debatten zugänglich zu machen. Das Seminar beschäftigt sich mit der Rolle der Sozialwissenschaft in der politisch umkämpften Auseinandersetzung mit Migration. Zentral für das Projekt ist der Einbezug von Personen, die an der Thematik ‚Migration‘ wissenschaftlich, journalistisch oder politisch arbeiten, sowie eine inhaltliche Auseinandersetzung mit Formen der Wissenschaftskommunikation. Neben Übungen zu Wissenschaftskommunikation und divergierenden Text-Genres sollen im Verlauf des Seminars in Gruppenarbeit Produkte entstehen (Podcast, Blog-Beiträge etc.), die auf unterschiedliche Weise veröffentlich werden können. Hauptziel ist, Wissen über Migration und Wissenstransfer so einzubetten, dass Studierende Techniken der Wissenschaftskommunikation lernen und umsetzen, sowie verschiedene Disseminationsgenres bedienen können.

Lernziel:

Das Seminar zielt darauf ab, sowohl die studentische wissenschaftliche Auseinandersetzung mit einer öffentlichkeitswirksamen Thematik zu fördern als auch für die Rolle der Wissenschaft in jenen Diskursen zu sensibilisieren. Die Studierenden lernen verschiedene Disseminationsgenres (z.B. Podcast; Blogbeitrag; Science Slam) und Techniken der Wissenschaftskommunikation kennen. Über den entstehenden Dialog zwischen Studierenden, Akademiker*innen wie Expert*innen aus Fachpraxis und Medien werden unterschiedliche Rollen und Erkenntnisinteressen (öffentlich) sichtbar. Das Format stellt damit Kompetenzen für das publikumsgerechte Transformieren von universitären und öffentlichen Wissensbeständen bereit, was auch für die berufliche Weiterentwicklung und andere Lehrformate dienlich ist.

Anrechenbarkeit:

MA: Other Curricular Modules (Hautpfach 90)

Killias, Olivia
Ethnologische Perspektiven auf Erinnerung
Seminar
Do 14.00-15.45

Das interdisziplinäre Feld der ‘memory studies’ hat sich vor allem dem kollektiven Erinnern gewidmet, wie zum Beispiel stark ritualisierten nationalen Gedenkfeiern (Halbwachs, 1925; 1997; Assmann 1992). Seit den 1990er Jahren haben Ethnolog*innen dank ethnographischer Feldforschung wichtige Beiträge zu diesem Feld geleistet, und mehr Forschung über alltägliche Praktiken des Erinnerns gefordert (Kidron 2016; s. auch Antze & Lambek 1996; Stoller 1997; Werbner 1998; Cole 2001; Stoler & Strassler, 2000; Berliner 2005; Smith 2006; Argenti 2007; Palmberger & Tošić 2017). Die Vergangenheit kann sich auch auf stillere Art und Weise offenbaren, wie zum Beispiel Carole Kidron (2009) in ihrer Arbeit über die Erinnerungen von Kindern von Holocaust-Überlebenden gezeigt hat – in Spuren auf Körpern, in alltäglichen Gewohnheiten oder in der Beziehung einer Person zu Objekten. In diesem Seminar werden wir uns ethnologischen Forschungen annähern, die sich aus unterschiedlichen Perspektiven - politisch, sozial, medizinisch - mit Erinnern und Vergessen auseinandergesetzt haben.

Unterrichtsmaterialien

Berliner, David C. 2005. ‘The Abuses of Memory: Reflections on the Memory Boom in Anthropology’. Anthropological Quarterly 78 (1): 197–211.
Carsten, Janet (ed.). 2007. Ghosts of Memory: Essays on Remembrance and Relatedness. Malden, MA: Blackwell.
Kidron, Carol A. 2009. ‘Toward an Ethnography of Silence: The Lived Presence of the Past in the Everyday Life of Holocaust Trauma Survivors and Their Descendants in Israel’. Current Anthropology 50 (1): 5–27.
Kidron, Carol A. 2016. "Memory". In Oxford Bibliographies in Anthropology, http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo- 9780199766567/obo- 9780199766567-0155.xml (accessed 08 March 2021).
Lambek, Michael and Paul Antze. 1996. "Introduction". In Antze, Paul and Michael Lambeck (eds.). Tense Past: Essays in Trauma and Memory. New York: Routledge: xi-xxxviii.
Leibing, Annette, and Lawrence Cohen (eds.). 2006. Thinking about dementia: Culture, loss, and the anthropology of senility. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.
Palmberger, Monika, and Jelena Tošić. 2017. Memories on the Move: Experiencing Mobility, Rethinking the Past. London: Palgrave Macmillan.
Stoler, Ann Laura, and Karen Strassler. 2000. "Castings for the Colonial: Memory Work in ‘New Order’ Java." Comparative S tudies in Society and History 42.01: 4-48.
Stoler, Ann Laura. 2016. Duress: Imperial Durabilities in Our Times. Durham: Duke University Press.

Anrechenbarkeit:
BA: Thematische Erweiterungen (Hauptfach 120 und Nebenfach 60)

McDonell, Emma
Research Seminar on Transformation and Development
Seminar
Mo 16.15-18.00

The world of today is shaped by economic and social transformation processes of tremendous scale that are changing the lives of people across the globe in unforeseeable ways. This research seminar tackles these processes from an anthropological perspective, looking at global configurations as well as local impacts and responses in a great variety of settings. Studying empirical examples and engaging with current theoretical debates, the seminar aims to develop a broader vision that gives credit to the ultimate complexity and ambiguity of transformation processes and critically examines the development paradigm and its implications.

Learning Outcome:

This research seminar introduces major debates and case studies with transformation processes and development. Students will familiarise themselves with the relevant literature and identify an original research topic, develop a relevant research question, and write a research paper on particular aspects of transformation and development processes.

Anrechenbarkeit:

MA: Focus Transformation and Development (Hauptfach 90, Nebenfach 30 und Nebenfach 15)

McDonell, Emma und Müller, Dominik
Kernbereich Ökologie und Wirtschaft
Vorlesung
Mi 14.00-15.45

Die Vorlesung vermittelt einen Überblick über zentrale Themen und Theorien der ökonomischen Anthropologie. Unterschiedliche Formen der Produktion, Konsumption und Distribution von Gütern werden dabei in vergleichender Weise und im jeweiligen sozialen und kulturellen Kontext betrachtet. Zugleich werden übergreifende Fragen nach den Strategien von (Über-)Lebenssicherung, Aspekten der globalen Einbettung und Ungleichheit sowie nach der Motivation menschlichen Handelns angesprochen. Anhand von klassischen und zeitgenössischen Texten werden empirische Fallbeispiele und theoretische Erklärungsmodelle vorgestellt und diskutiert. Besonderes Augenmerk ist dabei auf das Verhältnis von individueller Handlung, institutionellen Rahmenbedingungen und globalen Ungleichheiten gerichtet.

Lernziel:

Ziel der Veranstaltung ist es ökonomische Strukturen auf lokaler und globaler Ebene in ihren jeweiligen sozialen und kulturellen Kontexten zu verstehen und analysieren. Damit trägt die Vorlesung auch zur Debatte um Relativismus und Universalismus bei sowie zur Sensibilisierung gegenüber gegenwärtigen Prozessen der Globalisierung und deren Auswirkungen auf die Lebenswelten von Menschen in unterschiedlichen Teilen der Welt. Ein zentrales Ziel ist es zudem, ein Verständnis von ökonomischen Strukturen auf andere Bereiche des sozialen und kulturellen Lebens zu schärfen.

Hinweis:

Prüfungstermin: 22. Dezember 2021 14.00 Uhr. Zu dieser Vorlesung wird eine Wiederholungsprüfung angeboten (Termin: 2. Februar 2022, 14.00 Uhr). Bitte beachten Sie dazu die Informationen des Studiendekanats.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Hauptfach 120, Nebenfach 60 und Nebenfach 30)

 

Müller, Dominik
Aktuelle Debatten in der Anthropologie des Islam
Seminar
Mi 16.15-18.00

In den letzten Jahren sind „der Islam“ und „die Muslime“ zu einem Gegenstand zahlreicher öffentlicher Debatten und akademischer Diskurse geworden. Im Gegensatz zu dem zurzeit vor allem im medialen Diskurs vorherrschenden Bild des negativ konnotierten „Anderen“, zeichnet sich der gelebte Islam durch eine Vielfalt an Praktiken, Ritualen, Glaubensvorstellungen, Lebenswelten und Organisationsformen aus. Mit Hilfe einer ethnologischen Perspektive wollen wir uns im Rahmen dieses Seminars entlang verschiedener Themen mit der Komplexität und Vielfalt muslimischen Alltagslebens in verschiedenen regionalen Kontexten auseinandersetzen. Im Rahmen des Seminars sollen aber nicht nur lokale Kontexte thematisiert werden, sondern auch religiöse Transnationalisierungsprozesse und Verflechtungsgeschichten. Zudem werden wir uns auch kritisch mit der akademischen Wissensproduktion in der Anthropologie des Islam auseinandersetzen und Fragen der Forschungsethik diskutieren.

Der Schwerpunkt des Seminars liegt auf der Diskussion der Seminarlektüre, weshalb von den Studierenden eine hohe Lese- und Diskussionsbereitschaft gefordert wird. Im Verlauf des Semesters werden zudem verschiedene Gastreferentinnen und Gastreferenten ihre eigenen Forschungen vorstellen, was den Studierenden die Möglichkeit gibt, verschiedene Artikel und Themen direkt mit den jeweiligen Forscher*innen zu diskutieren.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Hauptfach 120, Nebenfach 60 und Nebenfach 30)

Neuhaus, Juliane
Regionalmodul Europa: Ethnologie der Schweiz
Seminar
Di 12.15-13.45

Dieses Seminar behandelt einerseits ethnographische Untersuchungen der Schweiz. Wir beschäftigen uns mit Forschungen einheimischer und ausländischer Ethnolog*innen mit einem Schwerpunkt auf Arbeiten aus dem 21. Jahrhundert. Nicht nur Themen und Fragestellungen einzelner Fachvertreter*innen divergieren je nach ihrer institutionellen Anbindung und Fächerkombination, sondern auch ihre Forschungsmethodik und ihre theoretischen Ansätze.

Andererseits untersuchen wir die Ethnologie der Schweiz in Hinblick auf Institutionen (universitäre Institute und heimatkundliche / ethnographische Museen und Sammlungen), Disziplinen (Ethnologie, Kulturwissenschaften, Populäre Kulturen, Europäische Ethnologie) und Regionen (Deutschschweiz, Welschland). Studierende erarbeiten sich selbständig Wissen über eine*r Ethnolog*in und de*ren Forschung in der Schweiz. Sie präsentieren erste Ergebnisse bereits in der Semestermitte (Dispositionen).

Lernziel:

Lernziele dieses Regionalmodules sind einerseits die beiden Kernkompetenzen des Recherchierens nach thematischer und biographischer Literatur und Information sowie sichere Quellenkritik. Inhaltlich werden die Teilnehmenden eine gute Kenntnis über die jüngere Ethnographie der Schweiz sowie die Institutionalisierung der Ethnologie hierzulande erwerben.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Regionale Ethnologie (Hauptfach 120, Nebenfach 60 und Nebenfach 30)
MA: Thematic, Regional and Methodological Extensions (Hauptfach 90 und Nebenfach 30)

Neuhaus, Juliane
Switzerland for Incomings: Ethnographic Approaches
Seminar
Fr 10.15-12.00

The module "Switzerland for Incomings" is targeted at exchange students from all faculties being guest at UZH with an interest to develop especially anthropological vistas on Switzerland.

We combine learning extra muros (outdoors’ application of ethnographic methods) with explorative and web-based learning. We impart knowledge of different ethnographic methods such as systematic observation, photo ethnography and interviewing. In class, we discuss texts prepared at home. These texts take in focus different aspects of contemporary Switzerland. We question current images about Swissness and Switzerland.

Please contact your teacher Juliane Neuhaus at: juliane.neuhaus@uzh.ch and provide information about

  • your home university
  • your major/minor
  • years of study in
  • Bachelor/Master

It is a thematic module granted with 6 ECTS and graded. This module may only be booked by mobility students (incoming students), both at bachelor's and master's levels. Bookings from other students will be cancelled.

Powroznik, Maike
Ethnological Museums 2021: Decolonisation, Dialogue and Digital Sharing
Seminar
Mi 14.00-15.45

The seminar deals with the topic of current ethnological museum work: What is the task of ethnological museums today in view of external demands as well as their own goals such as decolonisation, dialogue and (digital) sharing? What is their attitude towards the collections they hold? How do they deal with the collections they hold? These theoretical questions and discussions about and from ethnological museums will be complemented in the seminar by practical museum work on collection holdings. Together we can discuss the difficulties and challenges, but also the possibilities of a self-critical as well as open-minded and future-oriented museum work.

Learning objectives

Understanding the current museum debate from the inside perspective of an ethnological museum.

Literature

Flitsch, Mareile; Isler, Andreas; Kaiser, Thomas; Malefakis, Alexis; Powroznik, Maike; Sutter, Rebekka; Wernsdörfer, Martina. Zur Frage der Dekolonialisierung von Wissen in ethnologischen Museen.

Anrechenbarkeit:
MA: Focus Material Culture and Museum (Hauptfach 90, Nebenfach 30 und Nebenfach 15)

Sancak, Meltem
BA-Kolloquium
Kolloquium
Mo 12.15-13.45

Das Kolloquium findet wöchentlich statt und ist als Werkstatt konzipiert. Es begleitet Studierende, die bereits eine (von der jeweiligen Betreuungsperson abgesegnete) Disposition zum Thema ihrer BA-Arbeit ausgearbeitet haben, bei der Weiterentwicklung und dem Schreiben ihrer Arbeit. Im Rahmen des Kolloquiums stellen Studierende ihre BA-Arbeit vor und diskutieren diese mit der Dozierenden und Mitstudierenden. Je nach Stadium und Fokus der Arbeiten werden unterschiedliche Schwerpunkte problemorientiert diskutiert (Konzept und Strukturierung der Arbeit, Umgang mit Literatur, Verschriftlichung und Repräsentation, Einsatz unterschiedlicher Textgenres) und verschiedene Kernkompetenzen des wissenschaftlichen Austausches (schriftlich sowie mündlich) eingeübt.

Voraussetzung:

Buchung der BA-Arbeit. Ab Herbstsemester 2019 buchen Studierende die Bachelorarbeit während der vom Studiendekanat angegebenen Modulbuchungsfrist. Bitte beachten Sie auch die Informationen auf der Webseite des Studiendekanats. Im Merkblatt Bachelorarbeit (PDF, 76 KB) ist definiert, wer am ISEK-Ethnologie betreuungsberechtigt ist. Eine aktuelle Liste mit möglichen Betreuungspersonen finden Sie hier.

Wichtig: Vor der Buchung einer Bachelorarbeit muss die Disposition von der Betreuungsperson angenommen worden sein. Bitte reichen Sie die Bestätigung für die angenommene Disposition (PDF, 17 KB) zu Beginn des Semesters, in dem Sie die Arbeit schreiben, im Bachelorkolloquium ein.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Abschluss (Hauptfach 120)

 

Schwere, Raphael
Anthropology of Meat: Ethnologische Perspektiven auf Fleischproduktion und -konsum
Seminar
Mo 16.15-18.00

In diesem Seminar besuchen wir Porkopolis und begegnen überarbeiteten Mastschweinen. Wir lesen vom Wandel der Schlachthöfe und betrachten das Töten als ethisches, praktisches und organisatorisches Problem. Die Verwandlung des Tieres zur Substanz, Nose to Tail oder durch den Wolf zum Herkunft-unkenntlichen roten Gold, führt uns in die Fleischverarbeitung und -zubereitung. Zwischen Küche und Teller beschäftigen wir uns mit Phänomenen wie etwa mit Kamelfleischverzehr verknüpften Männlichkeitsvorstellungen in Somaliland oder mit dem Meerschweinchen-Boom in der peruanischen kulinarischen Revolution. Aus dem Korpus ethnographischer Texte an der Schnittstelle zwischen Human-Animal Studies und der Anthropology of Food lesen wir ausserdem über Fleischverzicht und Fleischalternativen. Schliesslich müssen wir uns aus aktuellem Anlass der Frage des Zusammenhangs zwischen Fleischindustrie, Umweltproblemen und den pandemischen Zoonosen des 21. Jahrhunderts stellen.

Das Seminar findet im Teilpräsenzunterricht statt. Besteht ein entsprechendes Bedürfnis, wird eine regelmässige synchrone Online-Teilnahme ermöglicht. Ausserdem finden je nach Situation einzelne Lektionen vor Ort und andere online statt.

Anrechenbarkeit:
BA: Thematische Erweiterungen (Hauptfach 120 und Nebenfach 60)

Sutter, Rebekka
Einführung in die Ethnologie von Ton und Klang: Klang- und Hörkulturen aus ethnologischer Perspektive
Fr 14.00-15.45

Dieses Seminar vermittelt Bachelor-Studierenden eine systematische Einführung zur ethnologischen Beschäftigung mit akustischen Quellen. Akustische Objekte von ethnologischem Interesse umfassen eine Vielfalt an hörbaren Äusserungen und Klängen, die von Menschen, Tieren, Objekten, Werkzeugen und Maschinen hervorgebracht werden: gesprochene Sprache im weitesten Sinne, Rezitationen, mündliche Überlieferungen, Lieder, Arbeitsgeräusche, Tierstimmen, Musik, «Atmo», etc. Damit eröffnet sich eine Vielzahl von Forschungsfeldern und Themen, die weit über diejenigen einer klassischen Musikethnologie oder Ethnomusikologie hinausreichen, unter anderem: orale Gesellschaften; kulturell geprägte Konzepte von Musik; Klangkompositionen als Artefakte; Musikinstrumente als Artefakte; Klänge als Stimmen ethnographischer Objekte; die Verwendung von Musik, Sprache und Geräusch in Ritualen; Musikkulturen im Wandel; sonic turn; anthropology of resonance; (Corona-) sound scapes; analoge/digitale Sammlung und Archivierung von Tönen und Klängen; akustische Objekte als Ausstellungsobjekte in Museen.

Literatur:

Brabec de Mori, Bernd and Martin Winter, Eds. (2018). Auditive Wissenskulturen: Das Wissen klanglicher Praxis. Wiesbaden: Springer.

Feld, Steven (2017). On Post-Ethnomusicology Alternatives: Acoustemology. In: Perspectives on a 21st Century Comparative Musicology: Ethnomusicology or Cultural Musicology, edited by F. Giannattasio and G. Giuriati. Luce: Udine, pp. 82-98.

Vallee, Mickey (2020): Sounding Bodies, Sounding Worlds: An Exploration of Embodiments of Sound. Singapore: Springer Singapore Imprint Palgrave Macmillan.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Hauptfach 120, Nebenfach 60 und Nebenfach 30)

Vogt, Lindsay
Regionalmodul Südasien: Love, Tech, and Trash: Ethnographies of Contemporary India
Seminar
Mo 14.00-15.45

This seminar offers a comprehensive introduction to the anthropology of contemporary India. Throughout the semester, we will trace three enduring human enterprises – love, technology, and trash – in recent ethnography to better understand how modernity*ies are experienced, pursued, and constructed in this incredibly diverse region within South Asia. The focal points of love, technology, and trash grant us a wide but strategic lens to view culture and society, inviting us to reflect on broader institutions and movements in India, such as nationalism, development, law and policy, industry, environment/alism, urbanism, artistic and cultural production, religion, family and friendship. This three-part lens, furthermore, will facilitate us as we consider larger questions of concern, such as: What shapes and frequencies has ‘the modern’ taken in post-colonial India, from large-scale legal and economic policies to aesthetic forms and religious practices? What social divisions and categories structure, stratify, suture, and cohere modern social life and why? How have the trajectories of modern institutions and ways of being (within India but also outside of it) been influenced by India’s colonial history? Throughout these discussions, we will interrogate the tropes and epistemological traditions that characterize research and popular debate on modernity and modernization (in reference to India and generally speaking), asking what these tropes reveal and obscure and how we should position ourselves in relation to them. To avoid constructing the nation-state as the sole, natural, or most significant container of sociocultural processes, our readings and discussions will trace Indian social life and politics within and across varying geographical contexts, including South Asia (India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives), global diasporic networks, sub-regional literatures, South-South scholarship, and other transnational circuits and formations. Course texts will consist primarily of ethnographies but will also include popular prose, fiction, and film.

Learning Outcome:

(1) To learn core debates, topics, and theories within anthropology of India, including but not limited to caste and class, communalism, economic liberalization, independence and postcolonialism, modernity and modernization; (2) to begin to see larger structural patterns in the how literature on a given theory or region can be connected in various ways, including specifically how scholarship of/within India has shaped the discipline of sociocultural anthropology in significant ways (e.g. subaltern studies, anthropology of the state, anthropology of development); (3) to practice writing & re-writing of own academic texts and to learn how to improve a piece of writing through revision; (4) to practice and improve one’s self-awareness and critical abilities in the reception of academic texts; (5) to practice and further cultivate skills in researching literature and its results.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Regionale Ethnologie (Hauptfach 120, Nebenfach 60 und Nebenfach 30)
MA: Thematic, Regional and Methodological Extensions (Hauptfach 90 und Nebenfach 30)

von Atzigen, Aline
Sensory Ethnography as Method
Übung
Di 08.00-09.45

Diese Übung ist ein praktisch-basierter Einstieg in die Methode "Sensory Ethnography". Sensory Ethnography ist ein besondere Vorgehensweise bei der in der ethnographischen Forschung die Sinne (sehen, hören, riechen, schmecken, tasten) aktiv miteinbezogen werden. Der Fokus liegt auf dem Erlernen und Anwenden von "Sensory Ethnography" als Methode. Die Studierenden werden ein kleines ethnographische Forschungs-Projekt planen und durchführen.

Learning objectives

Kernkompetenzen: - Forschungsfrage finden und formulieren, Schreiben und Überarbeiten eigener akademischer Texte und Rezeption von Fachtexten

zusätzlich befähigt die Übung die Studierenden darin: - Anwendungsbereiche für Sensory Ethnography als Methode zu kennen, - Sensory Ethnography in der Feldforschung praktisch anzuwenden, - Empirische Daten welche mittels Sensory Ethnography erhoben wurden zu organisiseren, analysieren und für einen Text zu synthetisieren, - aktuelle Debatten rund um Sensory Ethnography kritisch zu diskutieren

Unterrichtssprache

The class can be held either in English or German depending on the students taking part.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Ethnologische Praxis (Hauptfach 120 und Nebenfach 60)
MA: Thematic, Regional and Methodological Extensions (Hautpfach 90 und Nebenfach 30)