Veranstaltungstexte FS 22

Bristley, Joseph
Themes in Economic Anthropology: Production, Exchange, and Consumption
Seminar
Mi 12.15-13.45

Since its earliest days, anthropologists have been concerned with economic processes: the relations of production, exchange, and consumption that sit at the heart of human social life. Pioneered in the early twentieth century by Bronisław Malinowski and Raymond Firth, economic anthropology remains a critically important area of anthropological interest. This B.A. seminar provides an overview of some of the most important themes in economic anthropology developed in recent years. It will focus on new scholarly insights into the anthropology of debt, anthropological theories of value, and digital and sharing economies. It will also critically interrogate new theoretical interests in economic anthropology, ranging from ‘platform economies’ to the ‘real economy’.

Learning Objectives/Core competences:

By taking part in this seminar, students will become familiar with a wide range of theoretical approaches to economic anthropology, and with empirical material on the subject. Participation in this seminar allows students to develop the following competencies: a) academic competencies (data analysis, critical thinking, problem solving, comprehension of academic texts, use of academic sources, research); b) communication competencies (essay writing, presentation skills); and c) self-management competencies (time management, self-assessment, working independently).

Introductory literature:

Neiburg, F. and Guyer, J. 2020. ‘Introduction: The real in the real economy.’ In F. Neiburg and J. Guyer (eds) The Real Economy. Essays in Ethnographic Theory. Chicago: Hau Books. Pages 1-26.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Major 120 und Minor 60)

Derks, Annuska
Anthropology of Energy
Seminar
Do 10.15-12.00

Energy is a central issue of our time. We use energy on a daily basis to lit our homes, prepare and conserve our food and charge our electronic devices. Yet, energy not only empowers, but also transforms the world we live in. Energy has been central in the development of capitalism, in the quest for progress and modernity and in images of the good life. At the same time, its production and consumption are highly contested, unequally distributed and above all disrupting and destructive—and as such major drivers of climate change. This all makes energy a fascinating topic for anthropological inquiry. In this seminar, we explore the social, cultural, political, economic, material and infrastructural dimensions of energy, fuel and electricity. We will be looking at the role of energy in projects of nationalist modernization, the agentic assemblages of power grids, the social impact of electrification, the material culture of energy consumption, the politics of coal, wind, hydropower, solar and nuclear energy, the question of energy transition in the Anthropocene, as well as what happens behind the green screen.

Anrechenbarkeit:
MA: Focus Material Culture and Museum (Major 90 und Minor 30)

Dalmia, Katyayani
Gendered Subjectivities
Seminar
Do 14.00-15.45

This independent study is designed for advanced MA and PhD students who are engaging subjectivity, in relation to gender, in their research projects. We will think about “gendered subjectivities,” and their formation, through theoretical and ethnographic texts that analyze embodiment, as well as subjects’ ethical negotiations in relation to gendered positionality and experience. As this is an independent reading module, specific texts will be selected based on seminar participants’ interests.

General information on Independent Reading Seminars:

The independent study/reading offers advanced graduate students an opportunity for specialized reading on a topic essential to their research project. The distinctiveness of this type of seminar is that it is driven by the needs of the doctoral candidate or MA student, thus the curriculum is not pre-set by the instructor, but rather, structured according to what the group of participants (with overlapping research interests) would like to read and discuss.

Learning Outcomes:

This course aims to help students:
i) Identify the literature that is important for each of their projects, within the broader theme
ii) Fill a gap in their knowledge of this literature
iii) Improve their writing on this theme, through feedback from the instructor and other participants in the seminar

Hinweis:

Interested MA students should contact the instructor prior to enrolling.

Anrechenbarkeit:

MA: Other Curricular Modules (Major 90)

Derks, Annuska / Eisner, Rivka
Feminist Anthropology
Seminar
Di 12.15-13.45

This course will provide students with an insight into the rich history of feminist anthropology, as well as its current developments and debates. On the one hand, we will explore the opportunities and challenges that a feminist perspective can bring to anthropological research and analysis. On the other hand, we will discuss the ways in which the feminist project might benefit from an ethnographic way of researching and understanding the world. The articles, essays, and book chapters that we read will touch on the different ways in which the intersection between gender, race, ethnicity, economics, class, location, and sexual preference produce different experiences for people both within and across cultures. Core themes include the intersection between gender and kinship, experiences and performances of femininity and masculinity, queer theory, the body and embodiment, and the politics of reproduction.

Anrechenbarkeit:

MA: Thematic, Regional and Methodological Extensions (Major 90 und Minor 30)

Elabed, Saada
Methodenvertiefung: Einführung in die Visuelle Anthropologie
Übung
Do 12.15-13.45

Ziel dieses Moduls ist es eine  erweiterte Auseinandersetzung mit audiovisuellen Methoden in der ethnologischen Forschung. Die Studierenden werden in einem ersten Schritt in das Fach der Visuellen Anthropologie durch dessen Geschichte und Strömungen eingeführt. In einem zweiten Teil realisieren sie, stützend auf praktische Inputs, ein eigenes audiovisuelles Projekt. Der Fokus wird im Modul auf das Medium Film gelegt, wobei ebenfalls die Fotografie und Tonaufnahmen in der praktischen Übung beigezogen werden können.

Lernziel:

Die Studierenden erarbeiten sich ein fundiertes theoretisches Grundwissen zur Visuellen Anthropologie und lernen dieses in der praktischen Forschung anzuwenden.

Unterrichtsmaterialien:

Texte und Filme werden von der Dozentin zur Verfügung gestellt. Technisches Material (Kameras, Microphone etc.) werden so weit vorhanden zur verfügung gestellt. Eigenes Material der Studierenden ist ebenfalls sehr willkommen.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Ethnologische Praxis (Major 120 und Minor 60)
MA: Thematic, Regional and Methodological Extensions (Major 90 und Minor 30)

Elabed, Saada
Visuelle Anthropologie: Ethnographisches Filmfestival Regard Bleu 2022
Praktikum
Do 14.00-15.45 (14-täglich)

Seit mehr als zehn Jahren wird alle zwei Jahre im Oktober am Völkerkundemuseum der Universität Zürich das ethnographische Filmfestival Regard Bleu durchgeführt. Es ist eine studentische Werkschau, die sich inzwischen zu einer internationalen Plattform für junge studentische FilmemacherInnen weiterentwickelt hat. Im kommenden Frühjahrssemester und Herbstsemester 2022 wird das Festival im Rahmen eines Lehrforschungsseminars Visuelle Anthropologie gemeinsam mit Studierenden wissenschaftlich weiterentwickelt, geplant und umgesetzt.

Parallel mit dem Modul «Methodenvertiefung: Einführung in die Visuelle Anthropologie» wird die Theorie des ethnographischen Filmes weiter vertieft, um schliesslich den Fokus auf das Format „Filmfestival" auszurichten: Schwerpunkte des diesjährigen Festivals werden diskutiert und festgelegt. Die praktische Planung des Festivals (Sichtung und Auswahl der eingereichten Filme, Aufbereitung der Programminhalte, etc.) wird begleitet durch theoretische Auseinandersetzungen mit dem gesamten Prozess.

Lernziel:

Die Studierenden planen und organisieren das Film-Festival Regard Bleu 2022 von Anfang mit, dabei wenden sie ihr theoretisches Wissen praktisch an. Die Studierenden vertiefen ihr theoretisches Grundwissen zur Visuellen Anthropologie und üben einen kritischen Umgang mit aktuellen Werken in Bezug auf die Geschichte und Theorien der visuellen Anthropologie sowie aktuelle Fragen rund um die Ethnologie.

Unterrichtsmaterialien:

Texte uns Filme werden von der Lehrperson zur verfügung gestellt.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Ethnologische Praxis (Major 120 und Minor 60)
MA: Thematic, Regional and Methodological Extensions (Major 90 und Minor 30)

Finke, Peter
Master-Colloquium I+II
Mi 14.00-18.00 14-täglich

Master-Colloquium I is designed as a workshop for students before they start their fieldwork, museum research or extended literature study. Students get the chance to present their research project and debate their preliminary research concept. The formulation of research questions and state of the art, the writing of the research proposal, theoretical conceptualization, methodological approach, and ethical concerns are discussed with peers, senior researchers and supervisors. To pass the Colloquium, the research projects must be presented and discussed and a written research concept must be handed in before the end of the semester.

Students learn how to present individual research projects and discuss it with colleagues and supervisors. Based on these discussions, they develop or revise their research concept. Students also learn to give constructive feedback on their peers' projects and learn the tricks of the trade of scientific exchange.

Master-Colloquium II is designed as a workshop for students who have returned from fieldwork, done their museum research, or completed their extended literature and archival research. Students present their research results and experiences and discuss each other's research reports. Different issues relating to theory and empirical material, data analysis, and writing are discussed. To pass this course, the research must be presented and the written research report handed in before the end of the semester.

Students learn to convey their research results and research experience and reflect these. They are supported in presenting research findings and learn how to prepare and what to include in a research report. Students learn how to give constructive feedback on others' reports and learn the tricks of the trade of scientific exchange and collaborative knowledge production.

Anrechenbarkeit:

MA: Anthropological Research (Major 90)

Finke, Peter
Anthropological Debates on Power, Cognition and Institutions
Mi 14.00-18.00 14-täglich

In this course, theoretical contributions in anthropology dealing with power, cognition and institution will be jointly discussed. These are three important and powerful concepts that help to understand and analyse a wide range of topics in anthropology. Students are required to prepare assigned readings beforehand and discuss these in class. They are also asked to apply them to ethnographic examples.

Learning Outcomes:

This course enables students to critically read and analyse theoretical texts, to discuss them and apply them to their own empirical work.

Anrechenbarkeit:

MA: Other Curricular Modules (Major 90)

Finke, Peter / Heiss, Jan Patrick (Vorlesung)
Bristley, Joseph / Hertzog, Werner / Horat, Esther / Luchsinger, Tanja (Übungen)
Fachgeschichte
Vorlesung: Di 10.15-12.00
Übungen: Mi 14.00-15.45 /Do 14.00-15.45 / Do 16.15-18.00 / Fr 10.15-12.00 / Fr 12.15-13.45

Die Vorlesung gibt einen Überblick über die Herausbildung und Entwicklung der Ethnologie als eigenständige wissenschaftliche Disziplin in den verschiedenen akademischen Traditionen. Es wird nachgezeichnet, wie aus dem kolonialzeitlichen 'Orchideenfach', das sich ausschliesslich den 'Primitiven' (bzw. den 'Völkern ohne Geschichte', den 'schriftlosen Kulturen') widmete, eine moderne vergleichende Sozialwissenschaft geworden ist, die sich zunehmend für alle menschlichen Angelegenheiten zuständig erklärt. Auch werden die spezifischen Gemeinsamkeiten mit benachbarten Disziplinen der Sozial- und Humanwissenschaften gewürdigt.

Lernziel:

Dabei werden sowohl die unterschiedlichen thematischen Felder und Interessensgebiete der Ethnologie wie auch die verschiedenen theoretischen Schulen und Denkfiguren in ihrer historischen Entwicklung vorgestellt. In der begleitenden Übung werden Aspekte der Fachgeschichte und unterschiedlicher theoretischer Modelle anhand ausgewählter Texte vertieft und diskutiert.

Hinweis:

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Einführung in die Ethnologie (Major 120 und Minor 60)

Flitsch, Mareile
Regionalmodul Ostasien: Einführung in die Ethnologie Chinas in ihren transnationalen Bezügen
Seminar
Mi 10.15-12.00

Die moderne Ethnologie Chinas ist in einer Geschichte von wenigstens 100 Jahren begründet, die sich in der VR China, in der ehemaligen britischen Kronkolonie Hongkong und in Taiwan sowie in unterschiedlicher Verflechtung mit den westlichen, sowjetischen/russischen, japanischen und zahlreichen weiteren Ethnologien vor allem Asiens entwickelte. Es steht damit heute eine ausgesprochen umfangreiche ethnologische Fachliteratur zu vielen verschiedenen Themen der Ethnologie Ostasiens zur Verfügung, die vor dem Hintergrund dieser Geschichte entstand. Die Bedeutung der ethnologischen Beschäftigung mit China als ethnisch pluraler Weltregion in ihren transnationalen Bezügen und Beziehungen in Geschichte und Gegenwart steht heute ausser Frage. Wie verändert sich das Forschungsfeld aktuell? Das Regionalmodul vermittelt wichtige Zugänge zu der komplexen Ethnologie Chinas und mithin Studierenden die Möglichkeit sich zu überlegen, sich gegebenenfalls in diesem Regionalgebiet zu spezialisieren.

Lernziel:

Gewinnung eines Überblicks über ein Regionalgebiet der Ethnologie; Einblick in die Ethnologie Chinas und Ethnologie in China in ihren transnationalen Bezügen und wissenschaftshistorischen und fachlichen Dimensionen; anhand einschlägiger Fachliteratur Erarbeitung eines eigenen kleinen Forschungsthemas darin; Erkennen welche Möglichkeiten die eigene Spezialisierung auf die Ethnologie Chinas bieten würde; Kernkompetenzen: Quellen kritisieren; Schreiben und Überarbeiten & Literatur recherchieren.

Einführende Literatur:

Bruckermann, Charlotte and Feuchtwang, Stephan: The anthropology of China. China as ethnographic and theoretical critique. London: Imperial College Press 2016.

Dirlik, Arif and Li, Guannan, and Yen, Hsiao-pei: Sociology and Anthropology in twentieth century China. Between universalism and indigenism. Hong Kong: Chinese University Press 2012.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Regionale Ethnologie (Major 120 und Minor 60)
MA: Thematic, Regional and Methodological Extensions (Major 90 und Minor 30)

Heiss, Jan Patrick
Kernbereich Politik und Recht
Vorlesung
Do 10.15-12.00

Die Vorlesung gibt einen Überblick über Themen der politischen Anthropologie. Macht und Recht sind Grundlagen jeder Vergesellschaftung und mit jeweils kulturspezifischen Vorstellungen, Institutionen und Praktiken verbunden, die diese Sphären gestalten. Dabei bezeugt die ethnologische Literatur ein breites Spektrum von Optionen, wie politische Ordnung und Macht erzeugt und angewendet, begrenzt oder bekämpft wird. U.a. werden diese Themen erörtert: Egalitäre Gesellschaften und elementare Machtprozesse; Religion und Macht; das Verhältnis von Macht und Gewalt; Prozesse der Staatenbildung; Konflikte und ihre Regelung; Krieg; Mobilisierung, Widerstand und soziale Bewegung. An ethnographischen Beispielen wird die Dynamik dieser Prozesse veranschaulicht. Nebst der ethnologischen Perspektive wird auch die spezifisch moderne Gestaltung der politischen und rechtlichen Sphäre thematisiert, um die Dilemmata zeitgenössischer Gesellschaften, insbesondere des globalen Südens, zu verstehen.

Lernziel:

Ziel der Veranstaltung ist es politische Prozesse auf lokaler, nationaler und globaler Ebene in ihren jeweiligen Kontexten zu verstehen und analysieren. Studierende erhalten einen Überblick über wichtige Themen, Ansätze, Begriffe, Personen sowie zentrale Frage- und Problemstellungen. Damit wird auch das Verständnis und die Motivation zur Auseinandersetzung mit dem Themenfeld sowie zum selbstständigen und eigenverantwortlichen Arbeiten angeregt. Studierende erhalten so Einblicke in studienpraktische, disziplingeschichtliche und wissenschaftstheoretische Themenfelder, die allgemein für das Studium relevant sind.

Hinweise:

Zu dieser Vorlesung wird eine Wiederholungsprüfung angeboten. Bitte beachten Sie dazu die Informationen des Studiendekanats.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Major 120 und Minor 60)

Heiss, Jan Patrick
Lecture Series in Social Anthropology Spring Semester 2022
Kolloquium
Di 16.15-18.00

For the weekly lecture series in Social and Cultural Anthropology we invite scholars engaged in ethnographic research, at ISEK and beyond, to present their work. The topics of the presentations vary, covering a broad range of themes, geographic and cultural areas, and provide insights into current research and debates in Social and Cultural Anthropology. The presentations are followed by a discussion with the invited scholar.

Programme Lecture Series Spring Semester 2022 (PDF, 123 KB)

Learning goals

Students are exposed to the breadth and diversity of ethnographic research, both at ISEK and internationally, and become familiar with current debates in anthropology. In addition, the Colloquium provides a forum for dialogue and scholarly exchange, while students explore the potential of the academic presentation as a form of knowledge production in Social and Cultural Anthropology.

Requirements

Students choose a lecture and take the minutes. Furthermore, they research the topic of the lecture and write a short paper in which they present and discuss different points of view on the topic.

Anrechenbarkeit:
BA: Thematische Erweiterungen (Major 120 und Minor 60)
MA: Anthropological Theories (Major 90 und Minor 30)

Hertzog, Werner
Peasant Societies
Seminar
Di 14.00-15.45

About one-third of humanity consists of smallholder farmers who frequently transition between rural and urban settings. Traditionally, we have called these people "peasants." Although peasants are, to a great extent, self-reliant, their livelihoods depend heavily on market forces. Peasants are often portrayed as subjugated peoples, yet they demonstrate an unmatched capacity to mobilize and act collectively. Throughout the world, peasants have been, and continue to be, a formidable force driving political movements, resistance, and revolutionary change. Despite their importance, though, peasants continue to be misunderstood by us, urbanites. The Western canon has both romanticized peasants and described peasants as "backward." While some see no future for peasants in an increasingly urban world, others believe that these populations will thrive in the coming decades. What is true and what is false about peasants? How can we best understand their societies, culture, thought, and behavior?

This course provides an overview of classical and contemporary anthropological debates on peasant societies and movements. It familiarizes students with peasant groups located in different parts of the world and provides a basic conceptual set for students to comprehend and research them. The course addresses questions such as 1) What do peasant societies have in common? 2) How does social and biological reproduction differ between urban and rural groups? 3) Are there cognitive patterns across peasant societies? 4) Are there ideological similarities across these societies? 5) Are peasants risk-averse or decision-makers or rational maximizers? 6) What role do moral values play in shaping peasant behavior? 7) Why and when do peasants revolt? 8) And how has globalization affected peasant groups? And 9) Are peasants disappearing or making a comeback?

Anrechenbarkeit:
MA: Focus Transformation and Development (Major 90 und Minor 30)

Kuncoro, Wahyu
Regionalmodul Südostasien: Anthropological Perspectives on Indonesia
Seminar
Fr 12.15-13.45

With more than 17,000 islands and a population exceeding 270 million, Indonesia is a socio-culturally diverse country. As much ethnographical fieldwork has been carried out in Indonesia, many anthropological concepts and theories have their roots in this region. In this course, both historical and contemporary anthropological perspectives on this diverse country will be considered, with an emphasis on ongoing political, social, cultural and economic negotiations. In addition, glimpses into the everyday lives of the inhabitants will be provided. The examination of Indonesia will be conducted from a variety of perspectives, including Indonesia as a postcolonial nation-state, Indonesia as a large yet still unevenly developed economy, and Indonesia as the country with the largest Muslim population in the world. Various academic articles and chapters from monographs will be examined during our consideration of a diverse range of interconnected topics central in the anthropological literature on the region. Such topics will include nationalism and conflict, humanitarianism and development, gender and sexuality, and religion and politics.

Learning objectives:

This is a regional module seminar that provides students with an introduction to anthropology in Indonesia. This course equips students with the analytical tools needed to study the extremely diverse and complex society of Indonesia, and the skills to reflect critically on the historical and contemporary conditions of anthropology in this region. The two core competences of this course are as follows: 1. Criticizing Sources. Throughout the semester, students will delve into issues through discussion of anthropological articles, historical analyses, popular press articles, and visual media such as documentaries. Through this, students will develop the ability to ask the questions that will allow them to classify sources, and 2. Reading and Understanding Academic Texts. In connection with the first competence, this course aims to develop the critical reading and thinking skills of students. Such skills will allow them to address question of how different texts formulate problems, how to present research and analyses, and what relations can be seen between texts.

Literature:

Hefner, Robert W., 2018. Routledge handbook of contemporary Indonesia. London and New York: Routledge.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Regionale Ethnologie (Major 120 und Minor 60)
MA: Thematic, Regional and Methodological Extensions (Major 90 und Minor 30)

Leemann, Esther
Anthropology of Development
Seminar
Mo 14.00-15.45

This course provides an understanding of anthropological perspectives on international development. It includes a theoretical overview of development’s key terms and issues, and how these are understood and critiqued by anthropologists. We shall explore the relationship between development and anthropology, both in terms of how anthropologists respond to, and contribute towards, the policy and practice of international development. These concepts and debates are then probed further through examination of the politics of aid, donors, and policy-makers.

Through reading anthropological texts that take NGOs, aid workers and state development programs as their focus, the course will enable students to critically reflect upon the nature of bureaucracies, institutions, and modernization discourses, always keeping in mind the specific cultural and political contexts of these development relationships. The course then turns to the broad issue of poverty, its definitions, causes and experience, and violence and humanitarianism will also be examined, as well as competing hegemonies in contemporary development. Students will be encouraged to identify real life examples of international development programs to critically assess, utilizing the perspectives and knowledge they have developed throughout the course.

Main readings:

Li, Tania 2007. The Will to Improve: Governmentality, Development, and the Practice of Politics. Durham and London: Duke Press.

Mosse, David 2005. Cultivating Development: An Ethnography of Aid Policy and Practice. London: Pluto Press.

Ferguson, James 1994. The Anti-Politics Machine: “Development”, Depolicitization, and Bureaucratic Power in Lesotho. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Anrechenbarkeit:
BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Major 120 und Minor 60)

Leemann, Esther
Methods and Research Design
Seminar
Mo 10.15-12.00

This module introduces master students to the ‘hows and whys’ of using qualitative and quantitative research methods and prepares them for their upcoming fieldwork. The course covers the entire research process from the initial planning and preparation stages (finding an appropriate topic, thinking about the research’s theoretical basis, generating the research problem, choosing a methodology, selecting a case, writing a research proposal), to collecting and analyzing data (uses of secondary data, sampling strategies, interviews, participant observation, field notes, surveys, social mapping, visual data; grounded theory, narrative and discourse analysis; transcripts, coding, using computer software), and writing up. We will look into a range of topics like ethical issues, entering, relations in and leaving the field and keeping records. By the end of the courses students will be able to submit a research proposal (Forschungskonzept).

Learning Outcome:

1. Students know the ‘hows and whys’ of using qualitative and quantitative research methods: They know the entire research process from the initial planning and preparation stages to collecting and analyzing data and writing up.
2. Students know important ethical issues involved in doing anthropological research (relations in the field and beyond).
3. Students will be able to submit the methodological part of a research proposal.
4. Students are prepared for their upcoming fieldwork.

Anrechenbarkeit:
MA: Anthropological Research (Major 90)

Malefakis, Alexis
Praxismodul Museumsethnologie

Praktikum
Di 10.15-12.00

Dieses Modul bietet einen Einblick in verschiedene wissenschaftliche, technische und organisatorische Dimensionen konkreter Museumsarbeit. Anhand der verschiedenen Abteilungen des Völkerkundemuseums lernen Studierende die vielfältigen Tätigkeiten rund um Forschung, Restaurierung, Ausstellen, Archivarbeit und Öffentlichkeitsarbeit kennen. Im Modul lernen Studierende, in welchen Wechselwirkungen theoretische museologische Diskurse und die praktische Arbeit an einem ethnologischen Museum entstehen.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Ethnologische Praxis (Major 120 und Minor 60)
MA: Thematic, Regional and Methodolgical extensions (Major 90 und Minor 30)

Müller, Dominik (Vorlesung)
N.N. (Tutorate)
Ethnologische Forschungsmethoden
Vorlesung und Tutorate
Vorlesung: Do 10.15-12.00
Tutorate: Mo 12.15-13.45 / Mo 14.00-15.45 / Di 14.00-15.45 / Mi 10.15-12.00 / Mi 12.15-13.45

Diese Vorlesung mit begleitendem Tutorat gibt einen Überblick über die in der Ethnologie verwendeten Methoden und deren unterschiedliche Anwendungen. Dazu gehört neben der jeweiligen Technik selbst vor allem auch die Reflexion über Nutzen und Schwierigkeiten einzelner Vorgehensweisen sowie über die allgemeine Bedeutung von Methoden im Prozess des wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens. Es geht, mit anderen Worten, darum, was EthnologInnen eigentlich machen, wenn sie forschen, wie sie es machen und warum sie es so oder anders machen.

Lernziel:

In diesem Modul werden Studierende mit dem Spektrum an Methoden in der Ethnologie bekannt gemacht. Neben den verschiedenen methodischen Vorgehensweisen werden deshalb auch die jeweiligen Anwendungsmöglichkeiten und Probleme – unter anderem ethischer Art – besprochen, die je nach Situation entstehen können. Zudem werden wir uns mit neueren Ansätzen, wie dem der "multi-sited ethnography", sowie mit Fragen der Datenauswertung beschäftigen.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Einführung in die Ethnologie (Major 120 und Minor 60)

Quack, Johannes
Kernbereich Religion
Vorlesung
Di 12.15-13.45

Die Vorlesung gibt einen Überblick über die Religionsethnologie und - theorie sowie angrenzende Forschungsgebiete. Dazu gehören: Was ist Religion? Woher kommt sie? Haben alle Menschen Religion? Was ist der Unterschied zwischen Magie und Religion? Sind viele religiöse Vorstellungen und Praktiken irrational, gibt es verschiedene „Rationalitäten“? Wie werden religiöse Traditionen erforscht? Warum ist es oft so schwierig die Grenzen von Religion(en) zu bestimmen? Wie ist das Verhältnis von Moral, Ethik und Religion? Ist unser („westliches“) Verständnis von Religion auf andere Kulturen übertragbar? Was wären Alternativen? Verliert Religion an Bedeutung? Gibt es auch Forschung zu säkularen Lebensformen? Warum sind viele dieser Fragen problematisch? Zur Diskussion dieser Fragestellungen gehen wir durch die Geschichte der ethnologischen Religionsforschung. Darüber hinaus werden auch studienpraktische, disziplingeschichtliche und wissenschaftstheoretische Themen angesprochen.

Lernziel:

Einführung von grundlegenden Studieninhalten der Religionsethnologie und Religionstheorie sowie angrenzender Forschungsgebiete. Überblick über wichtige Themen, Ansätze, Begriffe, Personen sowie zentrale Frage- und Problemstellungen. Motivation zur Auseinandersetzung mit dem Themenfeld. Anregung zum selbstständigen und eigenverantwortlichen Arbeiten. Einblicke in studienpraktische, disziplingeschichtliche und wissenschaftstheoretische Themenfelder, die allgemein für das Studium relevant sind.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Major 120 und Minor 60)

Quack, Johannes
Research Seminar on Ethics, Religion and Knowledge
Seminar
Mo 14.00-15.45

Every person has a life to live. Acting inevitably means giving answers to ethical questions like: How should I live? How should I interact with others? The respective answers people give in and through their everyday lives are affected by and embedded in knowledge formations and religious traditions. Accordingly, in this seminar we focus on secular and religious authorities, institutions, and traditions that guide peoples’ lives. Which forms of knowledge, modes of politics, and ways of living do they enable and inhibit? Why and how do people adhere to or subvert them? Studying ethnographic examples and engaging with current theoretical debates, the seminar aims to do justice to the complexities and ambiguities of human life forms and practices. It critically examines the authorities, institutions, and traditions that make certain ways of life appear natural as well as the conflicts that emerge around them.

Learning Outcome:

This research seminar introduces central theoretical debates and empirical case studies dealing with the anthropology of ethics, knowledge, and religion. Students familiarise themselves with the relevant literature, understand how the three themes are interrelated, identify an original research topic, develop a relevant research question and write a research paper on the basis of their own academic interests in these fields.

Anrechenbarkeit:

MA: Focus Ethics, Religion, Knowledge (Major 90 und Minor 30)

Rutz, Kiah
Stoff und Kleidung: Aktuelle Debatten einer Ethnologie des Textilen
Seminar
Fr 10.15-12.00

In diesem Kurs geht es um eine Ethnologie des Textilen. Wir werden die Geschichte der anthropologischen Erforschung des Textilen nachzeichnen und uns mit den zeitgenössischen Debatten der Disziplin auseinandersetzen. Einerseits werden wir einen praktischen Ansatz wählen und Produktionstechniken, den Einfluss neuer Technologien auf die Textilherstellung, das Material und das körperliche Wissen im Herstellungsprozess diskutieren. Um diesen Aspekt des Kurses zu ergänzen, werden wir Besuche in Werkstätten unternehmen, Handwerker einladen und selbst handwerklich tätig werden. Andererseits werden wir einen theoretischen Ansatz für das erworbene handwerkliche Wissen wählen und Textilien als materielle Kultur, verschiedene Lesarten" des Textilen sowie Hybridität, Textilien im Tourismus, und den Unterschied zwischen Kleidung und Mode diskutieren. Wir werden auch Textilien im Kontext der Globalisierung und des globalen Kapitalismus betrachten, indem wir Textilien als Waren untersuchen und globale Lieferketten verfolgen. Schließlich werden wir uns mit der Nachhaltigkeit des Textilen beschäftigen, indem wir Textilien über ihren sozialen Lebenszyklus hinaus verfolgen und uns mit materiellen Transformationen durch Recycling und Reparieren auseinandersetzen.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Major 120 und Minor 60)

Sancak, Meltem
Soviet Sozialismus, Markt und Post-Sozialismus
Seminar
Di 14.00-15.45

Dieser Kurs befasst sich mit post-sozialistischen Gesellschaften sowjetischer Prägung, die sich seit dem Fall des Sozialismus vor 30 Jahren in einem fortwährenden Prozess von Wandel befinden. Die Veranstaltung fokussiert dabei auf die Veränderungen wie Kontinuitäten ökonomischer und sozialer Aspekte in post-sozialistischen Gesellschaften. Der Kurs bietet die Gelegenheit, einige der wichtigsten politischen und sozialen Entwicklungen in der Welt während und nach dem Kalten Krieg zu überdenken sowie grundsätzliche Fragen zu Kapitalismus, Entwicklung und Modernität zu stellen. Die Vergangenheit wie auch die Gegenwart sind dabei kein einheitliches Modell, sondern zeigen eine grosse Vielfalt in der Umsetzung und Alltagsgestaltung. Im Angesicht einer globalisierten Welt wollen wir aus ethnologischer Perspektive eine der dramatischsten wirtschaftlichen und gesellschaftlichen Transformationen der Menschheitsgeschichte studieren.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Major 120 und Minor 60)

Schenk, Christine
Religiöse Konflikte und ihre Herausforderungen
Seminar
Di 10.15-12.00

In diesem Kurs geht es darum ausgewählte Erklärungsansätze zu religiösen Konflikten sowie dazugehörige Debatten zu verstehen und zu hinterfragen. Religiöse Konflikte treten in westlichen und in post-kolonialen Kontexten auf und betreffen unterschiedlichste Konflikte innerhalb von Religionen, zwischen Religionen und säkularen Gesellschaftsordnungen. Beispielsweise ist Bekleidung ein religiös konnotiertes Konfliktthema. Auch die Zugehörigkeit bzw. Abgrenzung innerhalb religiöser Gruppen oder auch Aktivismus für religiöse Rechte führt oft zu politischen Kontroversen, bis hin zu Gewalt und Bürgerkriegen. In all diesen Fällen stellt sich die Frage, inwiefern diese Konflikte rein religiös geprägt sind oder Religion nur als Epiphänomen (als Begleiterscheinung) in geschichtliche Prozesse und politische Konflikte hineinwirkt.

Didaktisch werden Beispiele von religiösen Konflikten aus Europa, Indonesien und Sri Lanka in mündlicher Diskussion sowie schriftlicher Darstellung aufgearbeitet. Für die schriftliche Darstellung wird die Schreibtechnik «Literaturübersicht» anhand von Zusammenfassungen entlang vorgegebener Fragen geübt. Abschliessend werden in einer Seminararbeit ausgewählte Beiträge der Literatur zu einer vorgegebenen Essayfrage in Bezug zueinander gesetzt und in einer Debatte verortet.

Lernziel:

Studierende der Ethnologie und Nachbardisziplinen
1.     sind mit der Technik der Literaturübersicht und Lesetechniken vertraut;
2.     können ausgewählte religiöse Konflikte wissenschaftlichen Debatten zuordnen;
3.     können ausgewählte Erklärungsansätze für religiös begründete Konflikte in westlichen und post-kolonialen Kontexten schriftlich reflektieren.

Literatur:

Wellman, J., James K. & Tokuno, K. (2004). Is Religious violence inevitable? Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 43 (3), 291-96.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Kernbereiche der Ethnologie (Major 120 und Minor 60)

Schwere, Raphael
Riechen, Geruch und Düfte: Ethnologie der Olfaktorik
Seminar
Mo 14.00-15.45

Der Geruchssinn prägt soziale Begegnungen–Gerüche sind Teil des Sozialen. Sie rufen Emotionen und Erinnerungen hervor und werden als soziale Marker und Mediatoren von Nähe/Distanz, Sauberkeit/Gesundheit/Ästhetik, Gemeinschaft/Identität, Status/Gender etc. wahrgenommen. Geruch ist kulturell, religiös oder auch politisch konstruiert.
Riechen ist eine Kulturtechnik und das Kreieren und Einsetzen von Duft eine skilled practice. Riech- und Duftpraktiken reichen von Analyse/Synthese-Techniken, olfaktorischer Kreativität oder Geruchsunterdrückung, bis zu beispielsweise Aromatherapie und oder rituellen Anwendungen. Ein aktuelles Phänomen ist der Geruchsverlust als COVID-19 Symptom.

In diesem Seminar nähern wir uns der Ethnologie der Olfaktorik theoretisch an. Des Weiteren untersuchen wir, wie man der Volatilität von Geruch methodisch begegnen kann–in der Feldforschung, etwa im Sinne einer Sensory Ethnography, oder im Museum, wo das Sammeln, Bewahren und Ausstellen olfaktorischer Phänomene, als materielles Kulturerbe, eine Herausforderung darstellt.
Ausserdem bietet dieses Seminar die Möglichkeit, sich explorativ und empirisch mit einer smellscape zu beschäftigen. So wird Raum für das Üben von 21st century skills (kritisches Denken, Kreativität, Zusammenarbeit, Kommunikation) geschaffen.

Einführende Literatur:

Classen, Constance, David Howes, und Anthony Synnott. 2002. Aroma: The Cultural History of Smell. London: Routledge.

Drobnick, Jim. 2006. The Smell Culture Reader. Oxford; New York: Berg.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Thematische Erweiterungen (Major 120 und Minor 60)

Soeylemez, Hatice
Interpretative Prospects: Engaging Gender and Sexuality in Islam
Seminar
Do 16.15-18.00

This course is an introduction to the study of gender and sexuality in Islam and in the contemporary Muslim societies. It critically discovers ideologies of gender and sexuality with a particular focus on present-day readings/interpretations and realities. It aims students to examine, understand and analyse diverse aspects and interpretive possibilities of gender issues in Islam by looking at religious identities, discourses, practices, rituals, roles, sexuality and body. Through surveying contemporary literature and closely looking at lived experiences on sexual rights, domestic violence, fertility, marriage practices and masculinity in places as diverse as Afghanistan, Central Asia, Arab Gulf (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, UAE, Qatar and Oman), Middle East and North Africa, Iran, Indonesia, Malaysia, Bangladesh, Turkey and Muslims living in Europe, this course addresses key debates and problems including but not limited to how gender and sexuality is produced, constructed and mediated by religious discourses and practices, how the geographical and cultural differences are reflected in women's life and religious interpretations, how tradition, religion and modernity are conceptualized, enacted, embodied, resisted and invoked by both pious and secular women, men and LGBTQI community, how the feminist and queer approaches to the Qur’an, hadith, Islamic law and ethics are understood and how gendered images of Muslim societies in social media and film are represented.

Anrechenbarkeit:

BA: Weitere curriculare Module (Major 120)
MA: Other curricular modules (Major 90)

Tsigkas, Alexios
Rethinking Postcoloniality: History, Politics & Culture in Sri Lanka
Seminar
Fr 14.00-15.45

Sri Lanka has the longest colonial history in the South Asian region, having been successively occupied by the Portuguese, Dutch, and British empires. “Ceylon,” in its entirety, became a Crown Colony in 1815 after the British conquered the erstwhile autonomous central highlands and proceeded to radically transform the island’s political economy, leaning heavily on newly introduced plantation crops such as tea. The country gained independence in 1948 and has since faced a number of challenges–most notably a protracted and brutal civil conflict that ended in 2009, the legacies of which reverberate to date.

The aim of this course is to reflect on the postcolonial condition through the perspective of Sri Lanka. Comprising a complex mosaic of ethnic, linguistic, and religious communities, postcolonial Sri Lanka has struggled to articulate an inclusive national identity. Through a mix of ethnography, as well as literature from history and political science, we will consider how the colonial past echoes in the present. Specifically, we will inquire into fundamental categories of belonging such as ethnicity, caste, language, and religion; major landmarks in Sri Lanka’s recent history, such as economic and political reforms, natural disaster, and ethnic conflict; we will examine institutions including the plantation sector, military-industrial complex, and, significantly, the state; more broadly, we will grapple with questions of ideology, nationalism, violence, and resistance. Throughout, we will oscillate between past and present and seek out the fragmented effects of postcoloniality as a political reality, as well as scholarly concept.

*** This course is required for students who wish to participate to “South Asian Intersections: An Ethnographic Summer School,” Sri Lanka FS22

Learning outcomes:

    • To think critically about the history of empire and postcoloniality as an analytical category through the case study of a multiply colonized region–Sri Lanka; to consider how ethnography can illuminate the postcolonial condition but also, reversely, the value of postcolonial approaches to anthropological inquiry.
    • To consider what constitutes a region in academic discourse and practice.
    • To gain in-depth knowledge about Sri Lanka, a country with a rich ethnographic tradition, but otherwise underrepresented in the field of South Asian studies.
    • To examine through a comparative lens a number of analytical categories–such as ethnicity, caste, religion etc., which, while nominally associated with the region carry significance for anthropology more broadly
    • Focusing on case studies from Sri Lanka, students will practice critical reading skills, learn to criticise different sources, and develop a deeper understanding of academic writing.
  • Anrechenbarkeit:

    BA: Thematische Erweiterungen (Major 120 und Minor 60)

    Vogt, Lindsay
    Doing Ethnography
    Übung
    Mi 14.00-15.45

    In this course, you will apply ethnographic methods within the framework of a small individual research project. The aim is to learn how to set up an ethnographic research project independently, which means finding a research question, developing a research design and getting familiar with different methodological approaches. You will carry out your individual project, analyse your findings and put them into writing while we will be discussing important issues concerning this process via short readings in our sessions.

    Learning objectives:

    This course will support students in honing their abilities to:
    Formulate tenable research questions
    Present, share, and practice numerous ethnographic methods and assess their suitability for various topics and ethnographic situations
    Manage, analyze, and synthesize ethnographic data
    Formulate constructive feedback for peers

    Anrechenbarkeit:

    BA: Ethnologische Praxis (Major 120 und Minor 60)
    MA: Thematic, Regional and Methodological Extensions (Major 90 und Minor 30)

    Wernsdörfer, Martina
    BA-Kolloquium
    Kolloquium
    Mi 8.00-9.45

    Das Kolloquium findet wöchentlich statt und ist als Werkstatt konzipiert. Es begleitet Studierende, die bereits eine (von der jeweiligen Betreuungsperson abgesegnete) Disposition zum Thema ihrer BA-Arbeit ausgearbeitet haben, bei der Weiterentwicklung und dem Schreiben ihrer Arbeit. Im Rahmen des Kolloquiums stellen Studierende ihre BA-Arbeit vor und diskutieren diese mit der Dozierenden und Mitstudierenden. Je nach Stadium und Fokus der Arbeiten werden unterschiedliche Schwerpunkte problemorientiert diskutiert (Konzept und Strukturierung der Arbeit, Umgang mit Literatur, Verschriftlichung und Repräsentation, Einsatz unterschiedlicher Textgenres) und verschiedene Kernkompetenzen des wissenschaftlichen Austausches (schriftlich sowie mündlich) eingeübt.

    Voraussetzung:

    Buchung der BA-Arbeit. Ab Herbstsemester 2019 buchen Studierende die Bachelorarbeit während der vom Studiendekanat angegebenen Modulbuchungsfrist. Bitte beachten Sie auch die Informationen auf der Webseite des Studiendekanats. Im Merkblatt Bachelorarbeit (PDF, 76 KB) ist definiert, wer am ISEK-Ethnologie betreuungsberechtigt ist. Eine aktuelle Liste mit möglichen Betreuungspersonen finden Sie hier.

    Wichtig: Vor der Buchung einer Bachelorarbeit muss die Disposition von der Betreuungsperson angenommen worden sein. Bitte reichen Sie die Bestätigung für die angenommene Disposition (PDF, 17 KB) zu Beginn des Semesters, in dem Sie die Arbeit schreiben, im Bachelorkolloquium ein.

    Anrechenbarkeit:

    BA: Abschluss (Major 120)